Beloved Sonnet

My rose

In a field of darkness there is one light

Alone I seek to grow this lonely rose

Promise of future petals that are white

My love is dirt from which my flower grows,

Await my rose’s bloom all so fast

My rose’s beauty alike Polaris

With powers to erase my neglected past 

Trauma I hope it will not inherit.

Oh no!–the wicked Devil does arrive

His breath possesses the heart of fire

My rose has become his eye of desire

He shouts, “I need your rose to stay alive,

For I will pay you all your heart desires!”

I slit the stem of my love and she dies…

For my Beloved blog post, I decided to write a sonnet depicting the situation that Sethe is put in when she decides to kill Beloved. Sethe is the speaker, and the object of the poem “the rose” is representative of beloved. The motif I payed close attention to throughout the book was birth and pregnancy, which was meant to portray how the next generation symbolized hope. This is a reason why I was so drawn to Sethe’s incredible dilemma.

I wanted to capture a situation in which someone would kill something that they loved to save it. The image I had in my head was a clearing in a forest that had only one flower growing in it amongst all of the grass. Before the flower ever gets a chance to bloom, fire surrounds it. The only way to “save” that flower so that it can eventually blossom is to cut its stem like slitting a throat.

Changes by Tupac

In Tupac’s “Changes” on his album, Greatest Hits, he sings about various problems that occur in America. He references the war on drugs, racism, and poverty. Throughout the song, Tupac explains how all these issues are happening in our country but nothing is changing. He wants to see changes but recognizes that “That’s just the way it is”. Tupac confronts the harsh reality of our country’s unfortunate unfairness towards certain groups of people. It is especially powerful because Tupac is speaking from his own experience. He is able to give his readers an extremely personal view from his first hand account. He can convey his message by incorporating poetic lines into his lyrics.

“Misplaced hate makes disgrace to races”

This line is specifically targeting racism. In the song, Tupac expains how our hate is directed towards the wrong things. People tend to focus so much on the color of our skin that they don’t look deeper into the content of our character. This line utilizes assonance which makes for an especially striking line. It emphasizes how people need to stop judging others solely based on their race.

“And as long as I stay black, I gotta stay strapped

And I never get to lay back”

Tupac says, “As long as I stay black”, as if it is a choice. By wording it in this way, he is able to convey the message that as long as he is black, he will constantly be forced to keep his guard up. But it is not a choice. When you are born black, there is no escape from the constant racism and discrimination you will face. And that is a systematic problem that needs to be changed.

Overall, Tupac’s lyrics made for an incredibly convincing argument for change. By incorporating striking lines into his song, he could express the urgency of the issues that plague our country. Although this song is not the happiest, it addresses serious problems like racism, gun violence and more. Ironically, Tupac was killed at the age of 25 in a drive by shooting. It is important to talk about changes that need to be made to prevent these tragic events.

"Ain't No Grave" and Beloved

“Well, look way down the river and what do you think I see?”

While reading the novel Beloved, by Toni Morrison. I noticed a connection to one of the scenes in the novel to the song, “Ain’t No Grave,” by Johnny Cash.

There ain’t no grave can hold my body down
There ain’t no grave can hold my body down
When I hear that trumpet sound I’m gonna rise right out of the ground
Ain’t no grave can hold my body down Well, look way down the river, what do you think I see?
I see a band of angels and they’re coming after me
Ain’t no grave can hold my body down
There ain’t no grave can hold my body down

I found these lyrics to have a strong connection to the novel. The scene that made me think of this song was when Sethe was escaping slavery and taking the river to freedom. “Twilight came on and Amy said she had to go; that she wouldn’t be caught dead in dayIight on a busy river with a runaway.” Amy’s comment on being caught on a busy river was when I thought of the song, ” Ain’t No Grave.” A song about not letting anything put you down and rising above all. I thought of the song because of the line, ” Look way down the river, what do you think I see,?” This line in the song sticks out the most because I can see a connection to the novel. The awareness one has to have when escaping slavery because of the many risks. But then, looking forward and all the possibility of a better life and new opportunity. I think that everyone should give this song a listen because of the strong message it portrays.

Image result for god's favorite customer

Disappointing Diamonds are the Rarest of Them All by Father John off of his latest studio album; God’s Favorite Customer uses unconventional, almost unsettling metaphors to describe the love that is shared between him and his wife Emma. The chorus goes as:

Disappointing diamonds are the rarest of them all

And a love that lasts forever really can’t be that special

Sure we know our roles, and how it’s supposed to go

Does everybody have to be the greatest story ever told?

The theme of the song is to go against the traditional narrative of love being this perfect idea that love lasts forever but argues that love is actually flawed and not unique or special. Despite this love is still a “Diamond” and diamonds rarely disappoint. Love doesn’t have to be a fairytale for people to still enjoy it. 

The chorus focuses on the central theme while the verses use outright bizarre comparisons further his idea of love being imperfect.

“Like a pervert on a crowded bus

A glare of love bears down on us”

To compare love to the glare of a pervert is a gross outlandish juxtaposition, but in this case it works to further the theme song because illuminates the idea that there is both bad and good in love, but ultimately it’s still a “diamond”.

“Like a carcass left out in the heat

This love is bursting out of me”

Again we see a gross outlandish comparison but this line also has a deeper meaning because in many of his songs FJM infers to himself as a lifeless/emotional being, but despite this flaw in their love it’s still a positive experience.

“Like an oil tanker tipped at sea

This love’s contaminated me”

Particularly with this line we see the tragedy of an oil spillage but also the good in love, so while there is tragedy in love it ultimately triumphs.

Father John Misty is one of my favorite artists because he often goes against societal norms to define meaning in his lyrics to critique societal norms.

"From Eden"

https://genius.com/Hozier-from-eden-lyrics

Image result for from eden

I would strongly consider the song From Eden, by Hozier poetry, due to the imagery, the numerous symbolic elements and the perspective the song is written in.

From the first few lines of the song it is clear that Hozier is speaking to someone, and later on it becomes apparent that it is a lover that is not necessarily fit for him. These following lines draw the listener in and act as imagery within the song. He is clearly speaking directly to someone by repetitiously using the word “you” and posing a question.

“Babe, there’s something tragic about you

Something so magic about you

Don’t you agree?”

He then goes on to stating that this girl reminds him of his youth and using “his mirror years ago,” symbolically to convey this message. He speaks of his innocence and how she almost reminds him of that. He almost refers to her in an angelic way but she appears to have quite the opposite effect on him.

“Honey you’re familiar like my mirror years ago”

Lastly he wrote the lyrics with a religious background making the meaning behind the words go deeper beneath the surface. He says “I slither here from Eden” indicating the Garden of Eden which is a biblical reference. It appears that he gave up some form of paradise for this girl. By describing himself as a serpent within the garden, it makes him out to be below her, making her out to be a goddess.

I slithered here from Eden just to sit outside your door”

Throughout the lyrics, Hozier uses numerous poetic elements to convey his true meaning behind the words. Although the exact meaning isn’t really known, the use of these poetic elements create a deeper thought process for the listener.

A Love Song For Sethe

If you had to describe the relationship between Sethe and Paul D in one word, I think it would be safe to call it complicated. No relationship is perfect, but not every day do find out that your significant other has murdered their child. It’s hard to argue that either party in the relationship was mentally healthy enough to engage in a committed relationship. Both Sethe and Paul D carry extreme emotional baggage that often seeps into their present lives. This is not to say that they both don’t deserve a loving and committed relationship, but maybe they owe it to themselves to find another individual with a healthier outlook on life. I think that Solomon Burke sums it up perfectly in his classic You’re Good for Me. In this 1963 release, Burke sings about a complicated relationship with a woman he loves, but is constantly let down by. Burke begins with the melancholy lyrics, 

"You're a bad little girl, it's true/ But I'm not gonna walk out on you/They say you're a good for nothing, girl/But I'll stand up and tell the world."

When Paul D was informed that Sethe had murdered her youngest child, he fled the 124 household. Sethe’s moral image had become tainted. The lyrics depict Burke standing up for his mistress despite the fact that he’d already been informed about her toxic attributes. Though Paul D initially flees the house and falls into a drunken haze, he returns later, months after Beloved disappears. In addition, Paul D was originally hesitant to even admit that Sethe could have possibly committed the heinous act of murdering her own child.

Burke later laments,

"You're no good for yourself/You're no good for nobody else"

Not only did the decline of Sethe’s mental health take a toll on both Paul D and Denver, but her obsession over pleasing Beloved additionally caused her own physical appearance to decline. As Beloved became larger and uglier, Sethe seemed to wither away. Her physical strength and natural beauty began to fade.

 In the following lines, Burke changes his tone again.

"But you're good for me/Oh, you're good for me/Oh, sugar dumpling, can't you see/You're good for me"

Similar to how Burke seems to be trapped in a cycle of manipulative behavior, Paul D was once trapped between Beloved’s vendetta for her mother. As Paul D carries a heavy load of emotional baggage, he becomes an easy target in the crossfire.  

Burke finishes his tribute with the lines,

"That's all I'm living for/'Cause you're good"

After Paul D settled down in the Ohio home, his life began to reform around creating a stable home life. Though this would seem like an inherently positive change in his primarily independent life, it created an unprecedented interdependence between himself and Sethe. This subtextual dependence ultimately causes Paul D to return to the estate. For Paul D, there can never be too much water under the bridge.   

Violent Crimes – Kanye West

 https://genius.com/Kanye-west-violent-crimes-lyrics

“Violent Crimes” by Kanye West speaks upon his personal growth as a father and his shifting views on the world with his daughters growing up in it. This piece portrays the world negatively although later we see him learn through trial and error that it’s all apart of parenthood. West elaborates on potential but typical situations that parents endure with their daughters like their developing bodies, potential abusive relationships, and his past negative actions. However, we now see his views have developed after fathering daughter North West. Overall, the order of events in which his story is presented, the tone in which he raps and the message, categorize this song into a form of poetry.  

The lengthy intro to the song begins with extended and mellow piano tones as well as a female whose voice matches the instrumental effects. Later, West’s verse rapidly switches the tone as his extremely powerful word choice and stern voice include his thoughts towards fathering North as well as expressing fears of her being victimized by men. The need for West to keep his daughter protected from “pimps”, “monsters” and “playas” is mentioned by him. (15) West also combines forces using artists like Ty Dolla Sign, 070 Shake, as well as a voicemail message from rapper Nicki Minaj.  

On top of including these features West touches upon the physical aspect of growing up. The way that the world is set up, certain things are desired physically from men therefore creating set physical expectations from women. It is extremely apparent that this piece draws out the negativity in our ways as a society. As well as defining the negative values that women are associated with in present day. 

“I pray your body’s draped more like mine and not like your mommy’s”.

“Curves under your dress, I know it’s pervs all on the ‘net”


I understand that Kanye West is a controversial person in society today and that this song received an intense amount of negative feedback although I feel you cant let your views cloud your judgment with this one. It really broke down the parental role and shifted my mindset to understand what my parents endure without me even thinking twice about it. Some perceive the message detrimental although appear to be looking into the meaning more than intended. This piece proves itself as extremely transparent if you simply just listen.