GET OUT of here racism

Get Out, a movie directed by Jordan Peele, is a satirical experience that intends to display the problems with racism in America. The movie’s main character, Chris Washington, is in a couple with a white lady named Rose Armitage. The movie begins on a very nice note, seeing Chris and Rose planning a trip to go meet Rose’s parents, with Chris portraying the first poke at racial problems in America. He asks Rose if her parents know that he is black, and she tells him that they won’t care, Chris is hesitant of this, but still decides to meet her parents. The movie continues and Chris and Rose finally arrive at her house, and her parents seem extremely excited to see him. Everything seems good on the surface, but it doesn’t take long for Chris to start realizing some of the oddities that occur. Some of these oddities include black “helpers”, who share a resemblance to slaves, to which the family sees no problem with. These “helpers” seem to act very odd when Chris interacts with them, and one even tells Chris to “Get Out” when a picture is taken. A very angry brother who seems to be mad at Chris for no reason, and a hypnotic mother who toys with Chris’ mind. As time goes on, Chris gets more and more fearful of the situation, and so does his friend Rod. Rod brings up the common archetype in movies that the black people always die first, and really begins to worry for his friend. 

This is where the spoiler has to come in, because there is no way to talk about the movie as a whole without a spoiler of what happens. Of course, Chris is right about his fears about everything being too good to be true. The Armitage’s have an annual get together, full of white people, and they all seem very nice to Chris. There is a repetition of Chris getting informed that his physique is nice, and not just his, but physiques of all different types of black athletes. This of course makes Chris uncomfortable, but the caucasian people at the get together see no problem with it. Chris ends up wanting to leave, but Rose tries to convince him otherwise, as this happens, Chris’s friend realizes that one of the helpers is actually a man who was kidnapped a couple of months ago. At this point, Chris tries to leave himself, but unfortunately doesn’t make it out of the house. It turns out that there was something up the whole time, ) what a surprise) and Rose’s family lures black people to their house to make use of the “nice physique. They do this by surgically removing the brain of the african american, and putting the brain of the white person into the black person’s body. The movie ends with Chris killing the family members, escaping the house, and having a final standoff with Rose. In the final moments, with Chris bloodied and on top of Rose, a police car shows up, and Rose tells Chris that she wins, but Rod walks out of the car and brings Chris to safety.

 There are many satirical moments in this book that poke fun at the common problems black people face today. Another form of humor used is hyperbole, which as a whole is displayed when Chris goes to meet his white girlfriend’s family. Normally, there is a fear of being in an interracial relationship, and not having your parents know. This is usually met with disagreement, but nothing of this extent. Another form of satire in this movie is when Rose’s family insists Chris meets all of their neighbors, and they all make the comment that “Black is in fashion again”. Of course they are talking about the clothing, or are they? Another form of satire is on display at the end, when the police car pulls up with Chris on top of Rose. All viewers were immediately filled with sadness as soon as this happened, knowing the situation that will unfold, despite all of Chris’s efforts to make it out alive. Only for Rod to step out of the car and save Chris. 


These scenes are all different ways in which Jordan Peele tries to display the different problems with racism in America in this age. I think that some of the underlying themes of this are 

  1. There is a want for the assets that black people possess, although this movie displays it in an overexaggerated way, this is still true nonetheless. An example of this in real life is the recent exposure that black culture has been getting, and the term “culture vulture” that has been coined to white people.
  2. Another form of satire is one that I touched upon earlier, which is when the police rolled up at the end. Rose tells Chris that he is screwed, and that the police will believe her, only for it to be Rod. Although it was Rod, if it wasn’t Rose would probably be right, and in this situation, no matter what Chris says, he will be the one in trouble for what happens. This occurs in today’s society, the black person is often the first one suspected when it comes to crime, and the one who will be incarcerated.
  3. The problem with interracial relationships today. This was an exaggeration, but in the beginning you see Chris and how tense he is that her parents still don’t know that he is black.

This clip shows Chris’s friend, it is a funny clip, but it does a good job showing the fear that a black man has when it comes to problems like this.

These are only a few reasons that display why Get Out was not only funny, scary, and interesting, but also extremely moving, and capable of showing the many problems with America today

The Horrific Brilliance of Get Out

Get Out, directed by Jordan Peele, is a Mystery/Thriller movie that was released in 2017. As a realistic thriller fan, I had been looking forward to seeing this movie as soon as the first few trailers started coming out (practically a year before the actual movie was released). You can click this video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uG_KHjd_PSc to see one of the many examples of satire shown throughout the movie. 

I would definitely classify this movie as more of a “horror parody”. Although I didn’t necessarily realize all of the examples of satire and irony in the film while I was watching it, all of the scenes and their true meaning started to make sense to me after I had watched the whole film. Even now, almost three years after I originally saw the movie, I still read articles and watch videos about the true meaning and hidden messages behind certain scenes in the film. One of the most shown examples of satire woven throughout the movie is the idea of “liberal racism”, i.e. the white family members talking about how much they love black people and their “genetic makeup” to the point that it objectifies them and unravels to show racism at its purest form. The wealthy white characters are so obsessed with Chris (main character, black boyfriend to a white girl) and the way he looks and acts that it almost comes off as disrespectful and most definitely intrusive. 

Another example of satire is the concept of racism and its relationship with police. When Rose (Chris’s girlfriend) is pulled over, the police officer asks for Chris’s ID, even though he was just a passenger in the car. Rose then flips out on the officer, asking him why he would ever need to see the passengers ID, which contributes to her characterization as someone trying so hard not to show their racism that it backfires. Jordan Poole is depicting a scene of racism and exaggerating it to show just how ridiculous some of the situations black people find themselves in due to facing a bias/stereotype truly are, especially with the police. 

Jordan Poole, in my opinion, does a truly outstanding job in showing all of the examples of racism that people look past in society. This movie definitely helped me to better understand the world around me, and I hope it did that for others as well. 

A Sketch for Women? Actions vs. Conversations

A sketch for Women created by SNL is a sketch surrounding the movement of a day without women in 2017. Where the female cast mates did not show up for work that day, which meant they ended up missing the writing day. This sketch is written by Men for Women about discussing issues that women deal with. However, Even though women’s issues are the topic of discussions women are still sidelined and do not have large roles and the only lines they get to say are “That is very kind of you to say”. It is a very satirical spin of the serous conversations the are being talked about concerning women’s issues.

Irony is a large part of this sketch because the issues being discussed by 2 male castmates. However, the women that are present in the sketch are shown to be struggling with the exact issues that are being discussed. However, they are being ignored and unimportant, sitting by and letting the men take the lead (not intentionally). At a point in the sketch Kyle gestures to Scarlett and Aidy to ask their opinions on the matter and then as Scarlet starts to say something is immediately cut off. The Irony of the whole situation is extremely obvious.

Hyperbole is also used throughout the sketch with Kyle stating that “It’s not fair how, women are taught that they are only valued for their looks, why aren’t we [guys] being taught that”. The tone used is definitely a joking one showing the statement to be a hyperbole.

The sketch is trying to bring attention to women’s issues by first talking about them on live TV, because those topics are often left out or pushed to the side. A reason they have the men talking that is not as obvious is that certain people may listen to what a man has to say rather than a woman. The sketch as a whole is making fun of the conversation about women’s rights and its effects, showcasing some of the actions women have to put up with while talking about the issues.  

The Combination of Horror and Satire to Show Racism

“Get out,” directed by Jordan Peele, is a thriller and horror film about a young African-American man (Chris) who visits his white girlfriend’s (Rose) family for the first time. The family is extremely welcoming and accommodating, which Chris reads as the family trying to accept their daughters interracial relationship. But as time progresses, Chris begins to notice odd things. For starters, the family has many African American people who work for them, but they seem off and don’t act like normal people. In addition, One of the older members of the family is married to a younger black man, who while Chris is speaking to him begins to scream “Get out.” These events put Chris on edge, in addition to the families repeated beliefs that black people are “athletically and genetically superior” to white people. Spoiler Alert! I feel that the end of the movie must be spoiled in order to understand the satire and meaning behind the movie. Chris’ suspicions are correct, the family has different plans for him than to just have him visit. The mother of the family hypnotizes him into a “sunken space,” where Chris is detached from his own reality, watching it like a movie. We discover that the family has been doing this to the other black people who are in the house, but in this state of hypnosis, they have been putting the conscious of their white relatives into the black people because they believe black people to be genetically superior. The African Americans whose body it actually is are forced to watch what their body does through the sunken reality they are hypnotized into. Certain things, like flashes, can cause them to regain control and consciousness for a while, which is how the one man tells Chris to “get out” when a picture is taken of him. This man knows what will happen to Chris if he stays.

The film specifically uses irony and hyperbole to demonstrate how racism in America, although many white people think is much better, is not actually changed that much from the past. Irony is used with the contrast with what the family is expected to be — a democratic family trying to accept Chris — to what they actually are — basically enslaving black people for their personal gain. This contrast is supposed to shock the audience, but also supposed to represent the racism in our society everyday that we don’t notice. Hyperbole is also used in the movie. Obviously it is not possible to take someone’s consciousness and put in someone else, there is not technology for that. The use of the “sunken consciousness” is not meant to be taken literally, but instead meant to show how white people are still shaping and trying to control the minds of black people. Although this is meant to be extreme, it is also meant to shed light on the blatant racism that still exists in the U.S.

The movie is definitely criticizing modern America. The combination of satire and horror serves to attack racism and white people’s mindset towards black people in America. The writing shows how even those white people thought to be normal often have racist mindsets. Although it is meant to exaggerate the situation in America, it’s purpose is to also show how extreme and dire the situation with racism in America is, and what could theoretically happen in the future. I think Peele wants to change society with this movie by truly showing the racism occuring in America.

Dog Sees God: Confessions of a Teenage Blockhead

We all know of Charlie Brown, or Peanut’s, a cult classic that has shaped children’s literature for a while now. Charlie Brown is known for it’s lovable characters, american archetypes, and silly situations, and recently, a continuation of the Charlie Brown universe was created, but this play gives us a completely new twist.

Dog Sees God takes the characters and relationships in Charlie Brown and sets them years in the future, when the characters are teenagers. Instead of dealing with their previous innocent problems, the kids have new ones to deal with. Charlie Brown (now CB) is grieving the death of his dog, meanwhile questioning his sexuality and place in society, Sally (CB’s sister) is goth, and throughout the show questions her life’s true philosophy, and Lucy (Van’s sister) has been institutionalized for setting the little red haired girl’s hair on fire. The characters go through life in high school, dealing with others while dealing with their own personal issues and conflicts, and I won’t spoil it but the end brings tragedy and illustrates the unfairness of real life. Dog Sees God is about as far from the sentiment of Peanuts as you can possibly go, but somehow maintains the relationships and archetypes of the characters within their universe.

This play is full of satire. The most obvious would have to be parody, as this play is a direct parody of the original Peanut’s comics. Taking the original characters, this play twists them into extremely realistic adult versions of themselves, playing off of the little quirks the characters originally showed and exaggerating and forming them into phobias, diagnoses, and larger plot points. This play is also full of all types of irony. Verbal irony is used throughout the show in dialogue and interactions, bringing attention to the relationships between the characters and acting as a way to point out the extreme natures and flaws of some of the characters. Situational irony coats the entire show as many of the things the characters do we wouldn’t expect from them, such as PigPen ending up the “bully” of the show or Lucy acting as a psychiatrist for Charlie Brown from the confines of the institution she was placed in.

This is a comedic show (at least for the beginning), but the use of satire especially when in relation to such a classic children’s story brings forward the real problems with the social structures created in a high school environment. The characters from peanuts create a surprisingly good base for the archetypes of modern teenagers, so this parody works very well as a commentary on the toxicity of interpersonal relationships and friendships. The work is funny and comedic in the lines but also manages to bring light to issues like homophobia, sexual abuse, and addiction, especially when it pertains to teenagers. And by the end of the show, illustrates the consequences that can come from these actions when they are let grow and go untreated.

What “Beauty Queens” Will Do For Beauty

For the 50 teenage female contestants in the “Miss Teen Dream” beauty pageant, beauty is everything. A lot of them have spent their whole lives believing that this was the only thing that they could strive to do. So when the plane that they were traveling in crash lands on a deserted island, it immediately becomes apparent that they care much more for their looks and outside characteristics than they care about surviving and getting off the island. This creates a gloriously funny satire that coveys the point that the current standards of beauty for women are completely ridiculous and girls shouldn’t let them define who they are.

While all of the characters are completely hilarious, a great deal of the satire regarding beauty standards can be attributed to Miss Taylor Krystal Rene Hawkins (Miss Texas). During the beginning of the novel, her character serves as almost an internal antagonist to the other main characters. This is in most part due to her extreme desire to ensure that everyone is still doing all they can to prepare for the beauty pageant and conform to the society’s beauty standards even when they are running out of food and water on the island. Since this is obviously wrong, the reader can take away Libba Bray’s point that society needs to stop pushing women to prioritize beauty over everything else.

Interspersed throughout the novel are “commercial breaks”. These are short yet hilarious interruptions of the plot and usually come at times of great intensity in the novel. Most of these commercials advertise weird beauty products that seem completely ridiculous to the reader. These “commercial breaks” are one of the main sources of humor in the book and reflect the unnecessary beauty standards of the world we live in. By reading these advertisements, the reader can see how sexist and misguiding the current media is regarding the way women should act and dress.

While reading this book, I couldn’t help but laughing every 10 seconds. Each of the different personalities and voices of the girls was represented on the narration and the way that they interacted with each other was hilarious. The satire of the book was clearly understood and beautifully written and I completely agree with the argument she made about the beauty standards that society forces women to follow.

Satire in South Park

South Park over the past two decades has evolved into the purest form of satire in television history. South Park has been pushing the limits from the very first day from making fun of celebrities, politicians, religion, and any controversial event.

The four min characters are seen ( Cartman, Stan, Kyle and Kenny) * in no order, with the rest of the characters in the show.

South Park brings satire to the most controversial events in America. For example, in episode “World War Zimmerman,” the death of Trayvon Martin, and George Zimmerman being acquitted from all charges puts South Park to the test with this serious situation. In the episode, South Park satires the Stand Your Ground gun laws in America. Another example, of satire in South Park is when Stan’s little brother has an affair with his kindergarten teacher. In the episode, ” Miss Teacher Bangs A Boy.” The show show uses satire to show the serious issue of child molestation. An example of an celebrity being made fun of in South Park are Kim Kardashian and Kanye West. The episode ” The Hobbit,” shows the problem of trying to be perfect to match Hollywood’s standard. Also, the episode makes fun of Kanye for having no sense of humor, by making Kanye in the episode have outrageous outbursts. South Park is the best form of satire in television history because they show no limits in making points of celebrities, politicians, and controversial events. Of course, many South Park episodes have been banned on television. Also, China has the whole program of South Park banned.