Mutual Recognition vs. “Dry”

The novel “Dry” by Neil Shusterman takes the reader on a journey following a group of mismatched teenagers through a lengthy and deadly drought in future Southern California. The story begins following two siblings, Alyssa and Garrett, who search for their parents with the help of their geeky neighbor Kelton, after they do not return from scavenging for water. The unlikely friends end up traveling with a dangerous seeming girl, Jacqui, who agrees to take them in her car to Keltons bugout, where they promised water. Immediately after meeting Jacqui, Kelton developed a deep mistrust of her which was rooted in her age superiority and his own insecurities. This mistrust was mirrored by Jacqui as she worked to maintain the upperhand on Kelton and the rest of the crew. Benjamin expressed that mutual recognition can only be achieved after both parties acknowledge that the other has a similar center of experience. This lack of mutual recognition was highlighted after Jacqui forcibly took over the drivers seat from Kelton claiming she was the better driver. Towards the end of the story, as Jacqui is about to make a reckless and impulsive decision, the reader witnesses Keltons internal dialogue where he expresses that he sees Jacqui as one of the group and acknowledges that she is just as scared and lost as the rest. This crucial turning point for Kelton was reciprocated at the end of the novel where we meet Jacqui again and she is kind and respectful towards Kelton and the others, an action the reader had not seen before. The newfound mutual recognition between Kelton and Jacqui was great character development throughout the story and also solved an underlying unresolved conflict.

People v. Felony Murder Rule: Why the Felony Murder Rule Should Be Abolished

Since America’s creation, there have been many weird and unjust laws, from the Jim Crow laws to Marijuana being classified as a schedule 1 drug, America has been built upon initially unjust laws. In reading One Cut, you will learn about one of the most unjust and unusual laws still in existence in America, Felony Murder. Felony murder is described as “when an offender kills in the commission of a dangerous or enumerated crime, the offender, and also the offender’s accomplices or co-conspirators, may be found guilty of murder.” Now, this may seem not too crazy, but when you hear the stories of the law actually in use, you may change your mind. One example is Marshae Jones. As Ms.Jones was in a parking lot when she and another woman began arguing. After a few minutes, the words turned into a fight. Amid the fight, the other woman, Ms.Jemison, pulled out a gun and shot Ms.Jones in the stomach. Ms.Jones at the time was five months pregnant. The fetus ended up not surviving the gunshot wound, and a jury in Alabama indicted Ms.Jones, the pregnant woman, of manslaughter under the state’s felony murder rule. The felony murder rule, like many other laws, has unfairly targeted, in the majority of cases, minorities. As society heads towards an age of revolution, a time where blatant discrimination, the oppression of minorities, and unjust laws are looked down upon by most. Will Felony Murder be one small part of the systemically racist American legal system that will be removed during this revolution, and should it? When looking at the statistics and hearing the stories, the answer should be obvious, the felony murder rule is illogical, prejudicial, and grossly unconstitutional and should be repealed.

Inability to Escape From Lunacy

Abnesti and Verlaine operate under the guise of scientific inquiry, however there is no ethics in their experiments and observations. They test drugs on the lowest levels of society: prisoners.

They operate under the name of science, yet their actual reasons for continuing experiments are nothing but unethical. ” ‘Are we going to Darkenfloxx TM Rachel now?’ I said. ‘Think, Jeff,’ Abnesti said. ‘How can we know that you love neither Rachel nor Heather if we only have data regarding your reaction to what just now happened to Heather? Use your noggin. You are not a scientist, but Lord knows you work around scientist all day'” (73).

And when the small voice in the back of their heads say that maybe this is wrong, the beliefs of the system they are in quickly override any sense of sanity. … “Jeff, maybe you’re overthinking this, Abnesti said. ‘It is possible the Darkenfloxx TM will kill Rachel? Sure. We have the Heather precedent. On the other hand, Rachel may be stronger. She seems a little larger.’ ‘She’s actually a little smaller,’ Verlaine said. ‘Well, maybe she’s tougher,” Abnesti said” (73).