In Flight: “Cranes In The Sky”

“Cranes In The Sky” is one of the incredible songs featured in A Seat At The Table, an album written by Solange Knowles. The song is about recovering from life and trying to acknowledge your inner feelings and emotions. One verse from the song is,

I tried to let go of my lover
Thought if I was alone then maybe I could recover
To write it away or cry it away
Don’t you cry baby
Away

The listener knows that this person is trying to recover and move forward from their hardships. The use of the word “away” connects to the song’s title: Cranes in The Sky. Just like birds, Solange is trying to fly away, moving to a new part of her life. Solange wants to let go of her lover, cry, and write everything away. The word choice tells the listener that she wants to be free, released from her past. In the lyric, “Don’t you cry baby” it sounds like Solange is comforting herself. By this word choice, the listener automatically feels comfort and reassurance. Listeners are put into Solange’s head; they can hear how she calms herself down with those words. Then, the verse ends with “away”, reinforcing Solange’s desire to start a new journey.

In the chorus, Solange goes back to the image of birds in flight. The chorus goes,

Well it’s like cranes in the sky
Sometimes I don’t wanna feel those metal clouds
Yeah, it’s like cranes in the sky
Sometimes I don’t wanna feel those metal clouds

In these lyrics, Solange writes about how she doesn’t want to feel metal clouds. By using “metal” to describe clouds, listeners picture the clouds as a heavy weight. The imagery transports you into Solange’s life, and you can understand how weighed-down she feels.

By using a simile to connect two seemingly unrelated things, cranes in the sky and regaining control of your life, Solange makes her listeners truly understand how she is feeling. The vivid imagery and similes in the song make the read understand how Solange is feeling. In “Cranes In Sky”, readers can imagine the feelings and emotions that Solange is experiencing. The song uses figurative language and invokes emotion, turning the music into a poem.

4 thoughts on “In Flight: “Cranes In The Sky”

  1. Nick W.

    I love how the word “away” occupies its own line. That to me, screams poetry. Poets are always very deliberate about where they end lines, and they are aware that spacing can greatly alter the impact. When I see “away” all by itself, it makes me linger on that word just a little longer. Like you said, it gives me enough time to connect it to the title.

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  2. AVA ECKMAN

    The imagery you describe when talking about the metal clouds was very vivid and connected back to the theme of the song well. I also thought all of your examples really captured the multidimensional language in the song and how it connects to Solange’s personal feelings. I also liked how you connected it back to the title. The song seems a little sad but I’m definitely going to go listen to this song later.

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    1. ALEXANDRA NICHOLSON

      This song really has a lot of imagery in it and you did a good job of exploring how she let go of her past feelings. I love how the bird and the flight represents moving into a new part of her life. This song is sad but hopeful of a better future.

      Like

  3. ALEXANDRA NICHOLSON

    This song really has a lot of imagery in it and you did a good job of exploring how she let go of her past feelings. I love how the bird and the flight represents moving into a new part of her life. This song is sad but hopeful of a better future.

    Like

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