The Women of King Lear

The portrayal of women in Shakespeare’s King Lear at first glance seems very progressive. Once you start to read further you notice that the progressive nature of the women is only used to further the gender norms of the time. Goneril and Regan who are the most progressive female characters in the book are portrayed as villainous even though if they were men they would only be perceived as taking what’s theirs. On the last page of act 3, when the servants are talking about Regan and Cornwall, they say that they don’t care what they do as long as Cornwall advances in life however discussing Regan they say that women will all turn evil if justice isn’t swift upon Regan for what she has done. This discussion is very telling of the true nature of how women should be viewed in King Lear. One may argue that Cordelia is another strong female character in the play and I can’t dispute that however, she is not portrayed as progressive like Goneril and Regan. The one time Cordelia truly stands up for herself and speaks her mind she is ridiculed and disowned by her father. She comes back later in the play to help defend that same father who disowned her, once again serving the men of the play. She resumes her “rightful” place by her father’s side, respecting him as her better even though he was so awful to her. 

One thought on “The Women of King Lear

  1. Marina T

    The story is hiding under a veil of progress while actually perpetuating stereotypes. Women can’t be feminine, kind, but also powerful. Having bursts of anger and wanting control makes them the bad guys. Speaking your mind and being taken seriously was not seen as a possibility during that time period. This all makes you really question the definition of feminism because at first glance this play could be seen as feminist until you really dig into what is happening and the trends throughout the story.

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