Are You Happy?

Camus’ argument states that with the human condition, happiness is connected to the discovery that our world and our fate are our own, that there is no hope, and that our life is purely what we make of it. He states that people see life as a constant struggle, without hope. Any attempt to deny or avoid the struggle leads to unfulfillment. Camus’s single requirement for society is to live with full awareness of the absurdity of one’s position.

He applies this conclusion while transforming the reader’s thoughts of the myth. While Sisyphus is pushing his rock up the mountain, there is nothing for him but toil and struggle. But in those moments where Sisyphus descends the mountain free from his burden, he is aware. He knows that he will struggle forever and he knows that this struggle will get him nowhere. Happiness and the absurd are closely linked, suggests Camus. They are both connected to the discovery that our world and our fate are our own, that there is no hope, and that our life is purely what we make of it. During the time he walks down towards the rock, Sisyphus is totally aware of his fate. Camus concludes: “One must imagine Sisyphus happy.”

I agree with some of his thoughts and ideas about the human condition. It reminds me of self-improvement. In order to actually improve one’s mindset and over well-being, they must recognize where they are in life and accept it. This will allow the said person to begin their journey of happiness because they are in control of their fate. However, the one part that I do not understand is what really is happiness. If it is just being aware of your fate, what comes next? From the perspective of Camus, is there more meaning to life than working to accept your fate and ultimately being happy?

2 thoughts on “Are You Happy?

  1. Rachel C.

    Your analysis of Albert Camus’ theory is highly advanced. I find it interesting that a lot of people, including me, agree with the fact that we as humans must understand that we are where we are because of ourselves. I think that happiness comes from being content in the present; knowing that there is going to be struggling, there are going to be absurdities, and life isn’t the best, and then being okay with that.

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  2. ELEANOR R

    I completely agree with your point of how Camus’ theory plays into our day to day life. I think that the emphasis that his theory has on accepting the absurd aspects of life and recognizing that it is just a given is a really important lesson for everyone. Being able to accept the imperfections is the only way to move towards a sense of happiness and fulfilment.

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