Is Life Worth Living?

In Albert Camus ‘the “Myth of Sisyphus“, he argues that life is meaningless and not worth living. Sisyphus represents humanity and his punishment represents the daily struggles of life as a human. You could conclude that Sisyphus is happy because he accepted his punishment and decided to climb up the hill with rock everyday, knowing he wouldn’t reach the top and it would fall down. At the end of the story ,Camus says, “The struggle itself toward the heights is enough to fill a man’s heart. One must imagine Sisyphus happy.”

In conclusion, Camus thinks that life is meaningless, but doesn’t respond to Sisyphus’s sheer will to push the rock up the hill everyday, knowing it would fall down. This shows that mankind may have a meaning. The struggle to climb the hill everyday was a fulfilling task that could make Sisyphus happy. This is because he had a purpose or a task that could be inferred to a meaningful life rather than a meaningless one. This relates to us because the knowledge of failure is like to death and human life. Meaning, we know that we are going to die one day, but we still try to live.

2 thoughts on “Is Life Worth Living?

  1. VERITY F.

    I really like what you are saying. What I kind of got from this was that there is no meaning to life until you make one for yourself. I think you worded this piece perfectly, great job!

    Like

  2. ALINA S

    This is a really good way to put this idea and I agree with both you and Verity. Your examples from Sisyphus and relating it back to life having meaning if you find it is a really good point and I think it is definitely what Camus was going for.

    Like

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