Meaning in Illusions

In “The Myth of Sisyphus”, author Albert Camus argues that Sisyphus is happy. Camus explains that because Sisyphus is aware of the absudity of life, he can be happy even during his eternal punishment. He can realize that there is no point to his labor and find happiness just from doing something. Camus writes, “The struggle itself toward the heights is enough to fill a man’s heart,” (3). Although this is what drives Sisyphus to be happy, ordinary people can also find happiness without looking past the absurdity of life.

Most people today find meaning in their life through family, success, faith, love, and many other things. These are all illusions to distract people from what life truly is at its essence however I do not think this causes people to be any less happy. If a person cares about financial success, then they drive themselves forward with the idea that they want more than what they currently have. This drive may not be considered a great motive but it can keep people happy to have a dream in mind. Wanting enough money to live comfotably is a common motive in society and their happiness while getting closer to the goal is defineatley not fake. Even though at it’s core it is crazy to keep value in life based on pieces of paper is absurd, the happiness it can bring is real. It keeps people away from thinking about the randomness of their actions and drives them. If Sisyphus can be truly happy just lifting a boulder up a hill, then the absurdity of our actions and motives can also keep ordinary people happy.

Underwhelmed

For my summer reading book I chose to read Kobe Bryant. I was really excited to read this book by Clayton Geoffreys, but I soon lost that. After Kobe passed away I wanted to learn more about him so I thought I would choose a book that would give me more insight on who we was. I was very disappointed when I started reading because of how dull it seemed to be. After recently watching the documentary on Michael Jordan, “The Last Dance”, I saw no similarities between the two. This book did not keep me engaged like the show was able to. I knew about who Michael Jordan was, but not like what the documentary showed me. I learned about how he was off the court which was something the Kobe book could not do. I had a preconceived notion that the book would be the same, so I probably had high hopes. Either way the writer just did not do what I was looking for to keep me engaged with good story telling. From our previously read short story, “Good Readers and Good Writers”, Nabakov stated, “Every good writer is a good deceiver,” (31). The author of Kobe Bryant was not able to do this, however I did still learn some interesting things about Kobe’s games. I definitely give him credit for what he had to work with but I think this could’ve have been drastically better.

Good Guys

Toward the end of the short story “Escape from Spiderhead” by George Saunders, The main character Jeff was forced to watch Heather take her own life. Before the same thing was about to happen to Rachel, Jeff thought to himself, “It was like all I had to do to be a killer again was sit there and wait,” (76). After this Jeff saved Rachel by switching the Darkenfloxx into his own MobiPak. Although Jeff and Rachel were prisoners who had done very bad things, Jeff still had the humanity to not want to see someone die. By societies standards Jeff was the ‘bad guy’ for what he had done in the past, while the ‘good guy’ was Abnesti who forced this upon them. With no regard for either of there lives Abnesti was the one to make them endure everything as he looked down upon them. He had no respect for what he thought was beneath him all the while he tried to convince the prisoners that he was the ‘good guy’. Abnesti could not view the prisoners as humans which ultimately put him in the wrong.